Nilly Mozer

Nilly Mozer

Nilly Mozer was born and raised in Tel Aviv. She studied at Holon Institute of Technology and obtained a Bachelor's degree in Design and Arts. She also earned a Teaching Certificate from Tel Aviv University. She finds her multidisciplinary training enables her to expand her visual dictionary and make extraordinary use of traditional and up-to-date technologies available for her as a creator.

 

Mozer’s work lies in the sphere between design and art. She does not engage solely in art or design, but rather combines the two using different concepts that are visually reflected in 3D, photography, and installations. The different artworks serve as a means to explore the boundaries of each of the two disciplines. What she finds most fascinating is the connection between these disciplines, both in terms of the questions and the results. Her artworks look like everyday objects (carpets and bowls), yet they serve no functionality other than causing artistic reaction. In each one of her standalone projects, Mozer explores materiality and functionality, and the salient elements embodied in her work are repetition and humor.

 

Nilly’s creative mind and hands-on approach have been embedded in her personality since she was young. When she was a child, she wanted to capture the beauty of the rose so much that she picked rose petals and mashed them with water, doing her best to create acrylic paint. When she was older, she adopted a young pup that quickly destroyed her furniture, along with her front door. Nilly decided to seize the opportunity and transform the mess into art – she cut out shapes in her front door to make out the form of a man and stairs.

 

Her challenge in creating, as she sees it, is to reexamine commonplace things. Any change, as slight as it may be, creates something new that is unknown, intriguing, and raises questions. For instance, in the project entitled "120 km", she created carpet whose piles are actually penguins. It attempted to create a new, different world that unfolded the story of a journey. Another example is the work "Salt-It", which consists of a bowl, made seemingly of marble but, in fact, it is made of just two raw ingredients: cement and salt. She takes a simplistic approach in her production process, which is no different than normal sculpting or ceramic molding. Mozer’s intent was to emphasize the consolidation of two completely different elements. White cement is for industrial usage, and salt is 100% organic. Mozer attempts to use salt from all over the world in each bowl, including salt from the Dead Sea. She does not use pigmentation or artificial coloring of any sort, but the color of the salt is 100% natural – for instance, black salt that was enriched with carbon, or purple salt that was soaked in merlot wine.

 

Nilly says she is constantly creating out of limitations. Through her work, she’s discovered that restriction can serve as a source of creativity. By drafting rules and obeying them in her work, the conceptual and configurational richness grows. For example, by limiting herself to the use of only two materials, she created the combination of cement and salt without introducing any other materials, such as glue or dye. The colorfulness of the bowls stems only from the colorfulness of the salt. She is drawn to explore what rules or limitations she can set forth in advance, what products will ensue, and what their statement will be. She believes in the power of imagination and artistic freedom.

Salt-it

"Salt-It" is a series by Nilly Mozer that consists of bowls made seemingly of marble but, in actuality, consist of just two raw ingredients: cement and salt. She takes a simplistic approach in her production process, which is no different than normal sculpting or ceramic molding. Mozer’s intent was to emphasize the consolidation of two completely different elements. White cement is for industrial usage, and the salt she uses is 100% organic. She does not use pigmentation or artificial coloring of any sort, but the color of the salt is 100% natural – for instance, black salt that was enriched with carbon, or purple salt that was soaked in merlot wine. Mozer attempts to use salt from all over the world in each bowl, including salt from the Dead Sea. Each piece is unique and one of a kind, which is also the way Nilly views the world and her surroundings. She captures and embraces the beauty of each visual frame, and is also able to find beauty in what appears to be defective and broken. 

 

Nilly says she is constantly creating out of limitations. Through her work, she’s discovered that restriction and minimalism can serve as a source of creativity. By drafting rules and obeying them in her work, the conceptual and configurational richness grows. For example, by limiting herself to the use of only two materials in “Salt-it," she created the combination of cement and salt without introducing any other materials, such as glue or dye. The colorfulness of the bowls stems only from the colorfulness of the salt. She is drawn to explore what rules or limitations she can be set forth in advance, what products will ensue, and what their statement will be. She embraces the roughness of raw materials instead of pieces that are too “polished," and believes it is the dissonance of materials used that makes a piece unique. She believes in the power of imagination and artistic freedom.